Windows 10 Key logger DiagTrack -What is does and how to disable it!!

DiagTrack -What is does and how to disable it!! 


It looks like Microsoft may be collecting a lot more feedback from you behind the scenes. Microsoft collects information about you, your devices, applications and networks, and your use of those devices, applications and networks.

 " This isn't the only thing Microsoft is collecting, According to the Privacy Policy, the company is collecting things like text inputted into the operating system, the details of any/all files on your system, voice input and program information.



OK so if they're storing typed characters in some fields temporarily to help improve autocorrect, that's great. If they're storing every character I type, including all my passwords and personal information, I just want to know that so I can make an educated decision as to what I should and shouldn't do with the alpha/beta/whatever.  

In other words, if they're storing typed characters in some fields temporarily to help improve auto-correct, that's great. If they're storing every character I type, including all my passwords and personal information, I just want to know that so I can make an educated decision as to what I should and shouldn't do with the alpha/beta/whatever....

This from Microsoft:

We must stress that the feedback being collected in the Windows Technical Preview will only occur within the Technical Preview period. Once Windows 10 launches to the public as RTM, the data Microsoft collects will be removed from the operating system.
This isn't a permanent feature within Windows 10, and therefore should not be a concern to your average Joe.

Google Inbox: Review Tips & what you need to know

Google Inbox: Review

Google aims to reinvent email with Inbox. Here's a peek inside the invitation-only app, plus tips for using it.

Google knows you have  an email problem: the endless promotions from retailers, the droves of spam, and (hidden somewhere in that drivel) the stuff that actually matters, like messages from friends and family. That's where its Inbox app, Google's newest take on managing and using email, comes in.

Inbox, which debuted Wednesday, completely reimagines your inbox. The app doesn't replace Gmail on the Web or its mobile app, but it integrates with your account as an alternative way to organize and visualize your messages. While our online habits have changed since Google introduced Gmail 10 years ago, Google says, email hasn't evolved with us.

Inbox organizes your messages into bundles, such as Social, Promotions, and Finance. It also highlights important information like event details and photos emailed by friends and family, and lets you control what you want to see -- now, later, and never -- through a series of new actions.

Inbox's sweet ass new design and approach to email might not be for everyone, but it also could be the solution you're looking for.

Here's a look at what makes the app different, and a peek into its features.

1. Inbox is invitation-only.
Anxious to try Inbox? You may have to wait. Google's limited release of the app is reminiscent of Gmail's launch and requires an invitation from someone who already has access. If you're lucky enough to get your hands on one, it will point you to either Google Play or the Apple App Store to download it. Inbox isn't available for Google Apps business users.

An invitation will also give you access to the desktop version at inbox.google.com, but only via the Chrome browser. If you don't have an invitation, email inbox@google.com to get on the list for subsequent invitation releases.

Inbox doesn't replace your mobile Gmail app or the traditional desktop site, it's just an alternative. Google says Gmail "isn't going anywhere" -- Inbox is just "a new experience designed and developed alongside Gmail."

2. It Modern & Colorful but...
It can seem a little overwhelming at first. You'll notice that your messages are grouped by date, with Today at top, followed by Yesterday, and This month.
Inbox also corrals your messages into categories, which resurface as bundles of emails when you receive something new.

Two of these bundles include Social and Promotions, which you already had the option to use as tabs within the desktop version of Gmail. New categories that Inbox introduces include Finance, which files bills and statements; Purchases, which feature tracking numbers and receipts; and Travel, for updates from airlines and hotel confirmations. You can create your own bundles, too.

When you receive an email confirmation for a hotel you booked, for example, you'll see your Travel bundle bump to the top of Inbox and display booking details, such as the name of the hotel and dates you're staying there. Click or tap the bundle to view your new email, along with all the old stuff in 
ails on package deliveries. Google says this approach gives you more information at a glance.

3. Get to know the buttons.
Inbox introduces a series of buttons that can be a little confusing to figure out. From the main view of Inbox, you can "sweep" a category -- denoted with a check-mark icon -- which dismisses an entire bundle of emails. When you sweep a bundle, those messages are sent to a separate Done tab, which you can access from the menu in the top-left. The Done tab is an archive of your old emails.

By clicking or tapping the thumbtack icon, you can pin emails to your inbox that you still need to read or follow-up on. If the email is part of a bundled label like Promos or Social, it will show up individually in your inbox. To dismiss a pinned item from your inbox, click the check mark button or swipe right. If you need to find it later, you'll find it in your Done tab.

Replying to, forwarding, and creating emails is a little hard to find, too. To reply to or forward something, open up the individual email. You'll see a button with three dots above or beside the email header, and another inside the email next to the time it was delivered. Click or tap the latter to open the reply or forward options.

To send an email from within Inbox, click or tap the big red + button. Your most-recent contacts will appear as an icon, which you can tap or click for quick access. To compose a message, tap the red pencil icon. Inbox doesn't appear to have all the compose options that Gmail does; you can't upload a file from Drive or send and request payments, for example.

4. Use Snooze and Reminders to prioritize.
Inbox's two best features are Reminders and Snooze. Neither option is particularly new; Reminders is Inbox's version of Tasks, and Snooze is akin to the Boomerang add-on -- but Inbox does a better job of integrating them.

On the desktop version of Inbox, hover over an email and click the clock icon to open up your snooze options, which will bump that email to the top of your inbox at the date and time you choose. On mobile, swipe left. This option is handy for messages that you don't have time to reply to at the moment.

Reminders is another useful tool to help you keep on top of tasks. To set a reminder, click the red + button and choose the blue finger icon. Type in your reminder and set a time. On mobile, you can set a location-based reminder by tapping the "Pick a place" option. This requires that you turn on Location Settings. Your reminders will appear in your inbox and in Google Now, if you use it.

5. Give Inbox time.
Inbox uses a very different approach to managing your email, so there is a fairly steep learning curve. (I started using the app Wednesday night and, Thursday morning, am still getting used to the bundling and sweeping and organization of it all.) If you're a casual email user who prefers the chronological nature of Gmail, Inbox probably isn't for you. But if you feel like you're drowning in email and are looking for an alternative way to manage it, give Inbox a try, and give it time.

Phone Numbers for Hardware & Software Vendors ( Time to add some new Contacts )


Computer hardware\Software
Manufacturers Support\Service website link's and phone numbers


3COM
847-262-0070

3Ware
877-883-9273


Acer
408-533-7700

Actiontec
408-752-7700

Adaptec
408-934-7274
Addonics Tech.
408-433-3855

AG Neovo
866-333-3686
Altec Lansing
800-ALTEC-88

Ambicom, Inc.
408-562-0168
AMD
408-749-3060

AMS
510-353-0211
Antec Corp.
510-770-1200x330

Aopen America
408-232-1216
APC
800-555-2725

Asus
502-995-0883x3
Asus Notebook
888-678-3688

Atech Flash
866-852-8324
ATI
900-733-2841

B

BTC
510-657-3956

Belkin
800-223-5546x2263

Brother
800-284-4329



C

Cable Unlimited
800-609-7550

CardExpert
510-252-1118

Cooler Master
909-673-9880
Corsair Micro
510-657-8747

Creative Labs
405-742-6655
Cyber Acoustics
360-883-0333

Cyber Cooler
626-820-0999


D-Link Systems
949-788-0805



Edimax
408-988-6092

Epson
562-276-1300

Exabyte Corp.
303-417-7792


Fujitsu
800-626-4686

Gigabyte Int.
626-854-9338

Hewlett Packard
800-474-6836

Hitachi
888-426-5214

Imation
888-466-3456

Intel
916-377-7000

Iogear
866-946-4327
Iomega Corp.
888-446-6342

Ione
510-413-9018
Iwill
949-753-5488

J

Just Cooler
1-886-3-3296023-4

Jet Way Computer
510-683-6588


KDS
800-283-1311

Kensington
800-535-4242

Keyspan
510-222-8802
Keytronic
800-262-6006

Kingston Tech.
800-435-0640
Kingwin
888-588-5733

Kinyo Company
800-735-4696
Koutech Systems Inc.
562-699-5340

Labtec Inc.
702-269-3612

Laser Publishing Group
510-222-0199

Lifeview
510-661-2968
Linksys
800-326-7114

Lite-On
888-454-8366
Logitech (Retail)
702-269-3457

Macally
626-338-8787

Matrox
514-822-6000

Maxtor
800-262-9867
Microsoft (Retail)
800-227-6197x299

Minolta Corp.
201-825-4000
Monster Cable
415-840-2000

Motorola
800-521-6274
MSI
626-581-3001

NEC Monitors
800-632-4662

Netgear
888-638-4327

Orinoco (Proxim)
866-674-6626

open-e
678-666-2880

Palm
408-503-7000

PC Power & Cooling
760-931-5700

Phoebe Micro
510-360-0800
Pioneer Elect.
800-421-1404

Plantronics
800-544-4660
Plextor
800-886-3935

PNY Tech.
800-234-4597
PQI USA
510-651-7281

Proxim (Orinoco)
866-674-6626 

Qumax (Qtronix)
510-413-9018


Recortec
800-729-7654

Ricoh Corp.
800 327-8349

Samsung
800-726-7864

Sandisk
408-548-0275

Sapphire
909-594-0597
Seagate
800-468-3472

Sharp Elect.
888-467-4277
Shuttle
626-820-9000

SIIG
510-657-8688
SMC
800-762-4968

Sony
866-357-7669
Stardom Storage
886-2-2278-9697

STI
800-274-3475
Supermicro
408-503-8000

Swann Communc.
510-441-2133

Targus
714-765-5555

726-0303

TDK Elect.
866-629-3893
Thermaltake USA
626-968-9189

Toshiba
800-222-5805
Twinbridge
323-263-5931

Twinhead Corp.
800-995-8946
Tyan Computer
510.440.8808

USR
801-401-1141


Vantec
510-668-0368

Vaster
1-866-9-Vaster

Vastech Inc.
408-577-1888

Viewsonic
800-688-6688

Wacom Tech.
360-896-9833

Western Digital
800-275-4932

Wintec
408-856-0701


Xerox
800-821-2797


Zoom Telephonics
617-423-1072


Google Chrome Remote Desktop Setup & Helpful Tips

Google Chrome Remote Desktop Setup & Helpful Tips

Chrome Remote Desktop allows users to remotely access another
computer through Chrome browser Mac or PC from your Android device,
whether smart phone or tablet


You will need a Goggle account.
  • Chrome Remote Desktop service, as a host, is not supported on, Mac OS X 10.5, Chrome OS (meaning Chromebooks), Linux and Windows OS below XP.
  • Remote access is available to any devices that runs Chrome.
 
Install the Chrome Remote Desktop app on every computer you want to access remotely and every computer you'd like to connect from.
  1. Visit the Chrome Remote Desktop app page in the Chrome Web Store.
  2. In the upper-right corner of the window, click the blue + Free button to download Chrome Remote Desktop.
  3. Click Add in the confirmation dialog.






Once the extension is installed, click on the Apps button on Chrome's bookmarks bar.












Then select Chrome Remote Desktop in the tab that opens.
Once the app has been added, the Chrome Remote Desktop icon Chrome Remote Desktop App will appear in the App Launcher
When you open Chrome Remote Desktop app for the first time, you’ll be asked to authorize it. This will allow the app to do the following:
  • See your email address
  • See your Chrome Remote Desktop computers
  • Receive and send chat messages (this is how we get the two computers to “talk” to each other)

Chrome Remote Desktop requires extended permissions the first time it starts up.

With Chrome Remote Desktop open, you'll be asked to give the extension "extended access permissions" to your PC by clicking Continue. This process is really self-explanatory and includes choosing a Google account to associate with Chrome Remote Desktop. That way, you can just sign in to Chrome on any PC and be able to access your list of PCs.

After that's done, you should see two options: Connect to a computer to offer remote assistance or access your own computers. Tap the Get started button under "My Computers."





You'll then see a list of PCs connected to your account. If this is the first time using Chrome Remote Desktop then you'll only see one PC, which is the one you're currently on.

Since this is the first time using the service, you'll see an Enable remote connections button. This is required if you plan on accessing the PC remotely.

Select the button and you'll be asked to create a PIN to associate with the PC.
After a few seconds you will also be asked to enter that PIN a second time in a new window. All the PCs that use Chrome Remote Desktop require a PIN to prevent unauthorized access.
After that's done you are all set-up and ready to access your PC remotely.

You must enter your remote PC's secret PIN to access it.

Ok so your on a laptop and you want to access your desktop at home, with the Chrome Remote Desktop extension already installed and set-up on both.

Simply open the extension and click on your home PC from the list of computers in the remote access list, then enter the home PC's PIN in the pop-up window that appears.

Within a couple seconds you'll have complete access to your PC at home within the Chrome tab—

When you enter your PIN to access a remote PC you also have the option of telling Chrome Remote Desktop to not prompt you for the PIN in the future.
Just keep in mind that if you enable this feature, anyone who has access to your laptop could then gain access to your desktop at home.

Any PC that will be accessed remotely requires you to enable remote connections.